Projects
"Citadel of Apathy"?: Student Activism at UNL, September 1968-May 1969

Project Editor:Jillian Gotfredson, History 470: Digital History, Spring 2008

Active or Apathetic?

Overview
Lincoln, Nebraska: A Reflection of the Movement on a Different Scale
Public Displays of Activism: from protests to talk-ins
Hyde Park Forum
Students Unite: committees, groups, and unions
Who Protests?
What is Apathy?
National Context: a timeline of student activism on campuses
International Context: a timeline of student activism on campuses
Works Cited

Dealing with national issues as well as campus affairs, the DAILY NEBRASKAN found itself continually embroiled in controversy. Editor Jack Todd, willing or not, was invariably involved in the debates and acquired labels ranging from communist subversive to a fair and impartial editor.

The Nebraskan's editorials sparked heavy response as they advocated withdrawal from Vietnam, promoted various peace movements and attacked student apathy. An unrestrained writing style and liberal usage of related cartoons added to the controversy.

On the positive side, the open housing march, the voting age amendment and the state income tax received editorial support. Students were encouraged to voice their beliefs as the Rag attempted to advance the concept dissenters as thinkers, not trouble-makers.

The paper further expanded its role as a catalyst for student action with its wide news coverage. Issues extended from immediate campus questions such as faculty involvement in student affairs to outside problems, including the Biafran situation and the political candidates and their campaigns.

The 1968-1969 Nebraskan completed the transition from a campus activities slate to a paper with world awareness. Increased readership emphasized the change as irate students, faculty and community figures bombarded the editors with letters and lawsuit threats. Whether negative or positive, the DAILY NEBRASKAN did simulate reader reaction.


Source:

Author: 1969 Cornhusker Staff Member
Periodical: 1969 Cornhusker Yearbook Volume 63
pages:206-207
1969