John McConihe, Correspondence
MS 308
Box:1
Folder:7
Archives & Special Collections, University of Nebraska–Lincoln Libraries

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Dear John

It is a long, long time since I have written you but my neglect is really excu—sable. I have been knocked about from pillar to post sleeping in the woods and in the brush with no ink or paper and too wearied to say anything pleasing. About the 24th August we were at St. Louis and I thought I might get leave of absence and suddenly come down upon you, but we were as suddenly sent down in this region and so confident were all of an early engagement at or near here that I dare not be absent. I am very sorry now that I did not attend your wedding which has undoubtedly come off before this time. At all events I will congratulate you and wish you all the happiness it is possi—ble for a married man to obtain. You and Newton have fallen, two incorregibe old bachelors! I could not have believed it & it seemed like a joke when you informed

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me of it. Still I am glad of it and shall look forward anxiously for "my time," which I fear is far off; yet I shall live on hope.

Our Regiment is stationed at this point and we do not know where we are to go or whether we are to remain here. Whenever we are stationed, so that I can get away, I shall run down to Troy, but I should dislike to leave and on my return find the Regiment marched away, perhaps marching through action of country which could not be traveled by a person alone. I am desirous of being with my complany should there be an engagement and try the fortunes of fickle Mars.

Now, John, I find myself unex—pectedly swamped in a financial point of view with large unavailable assts on hand and can—not pay as fast as I can. I never dreamed of such a state of things, otherwise you would have been the last man drawn in by me. My will is good, but my pocket empty I think I could arrange with you if I could but see you. As to your Fathers[sic]

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Mortgage I think he had better take the prop—erty. I do not see how I can pay him well when the country again obtains peace. It will be impossible for me to pay the principal and almost so the interest especially at those high figures in these times. If he will re—duce the interest to 7% I will try and pay it and you too. I would pay the whole to—morrow[sic] if I could, as you very well know and I am the last man to quarrel with anyone when I cannot meet my obligations. We shall never have any trouble about our matters and I only throw out these suggestions for your own good I will deed that property to him any day to satisfy the Mortgage and as a soldiers life is very uncertain I will deed suffi—cient property to you to satisfty your claims. I will go to St. Louis at any time, after you have suggested what prop—erty you wish and in case I agree with you and have the deeds made out. You know my property and its value nearly as well as I do. I also ask the privelege

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of paying you the money should I soon get it and of redeeming the property deeded. Or you can let the matter rest until we meet, I want to satsify you, that is my aim and I have now and heretofore candidly told you my fix. Please don't mention our matters to anyone so that it may come to Fathers ears, as such things trouble him as you very well know in his old age. I know you are close mouthed and do not really fear you will think our af—fairs can be better mended by talking them on change. I merely make the sug—gestion to put you on your guard. You will consider this letter confidential and had better destroy it. I have a holy horror of being in debt, especially after sailing along so swimmingly up to this time and thro, such times as we have had since 1857. Write soon and with my very best respects to your wife

I remain as ever Your sincere friend

John McC